Making Biochar using Dry Mulch (video)

Tweet Subtitles: Making Biochar using dry mulch Mulch is loaded into an old beer keg Read More »

Biogas Digester

Tweet“Biogas is the perfect solution to modern sustainable cooking.” Biogas is a mixture of gasses that are produced as anaerobic bacteria break down organic matter. It is flammable, capable of producing a Read More »

Rebar Fence Trellis

Tweet“Make a self-supporting post-less fence trellis out of rebar!” In Spring 2011 I wanted to make a fence across the backyard for three reasons; to enclose a chicken run, to grow fruit Read More »

Mulching

Tweet“Make your soil as healthy as a forest floor, by mulching!” Mulching is the covering of soil with organic material. It is much the same as what naturally occurs in a forest Read More »

Worm Troughs

Tweet“Create masses of worm castings, and breed up masses of worms, with a worm trough!” A worm trough is a large and long container which allows for a different system of feeding Read More »

Worm Towers

Tweet“Create an instant home for worms in your garden, with a worm tower!” A worm tower acts like a high rise hotel for worms, allowing them to enter, stay, eat and leave, Read More »

How to Worm Farm

Tweet“Let the worms do the work, with worm farming!” A worm farm will take care of your kitchen scraps and turn them into some of the richest organic fertiliser known to man. Read More »

Encouraging Earthworms

Tweet “Earthworms are a gardener’s best friend!” Earthworms burrow through your soil, digesting organic materials, creating tunnels for air and water to percolate through, and distribute their castings as rich ready fertiliser Read More »

Cardboard Compost Bins

Tweet  “Get composting quick, easy and free with a cardboard compost bin!” Cardboard bulk boxes are used by people dealing with bulk fruits and vegetables. They are made of extra thick cardboard, Read More »

Cardboard Trench Beds

Tweet “Got sandy soils? Need an effective garden bed? Improve your soil and save water by making a cardboard trench bed!” Sandy soils allow water to drain quickly, which washes away nutrients Read More »

How to Compost

Tweet “Turn waste into fertiliser and save the planet, by composting!” Composting is the breaking down of organic matter, in a controlled environment, into humus, which is rich organic fertiliser (the same Read More »

Sheet Mulching

Tweet “Sheet mulching is one of the best things you can do for your yard or garden!” Sheet mulching is the practice of covering an area of land with a blanket layer Read More »

Tumbler Composting

TweetMake composting waterwise, quick, and easy, with a compost tumbler! Composting using tumblers is far easier than traditional pile-building techniques, and can be done entirely separately, or in conjunction with pile-building to Read More »

Human Waste Composting

TweetTurn your turds into tomatoes, with a human waste composting operation! Each time you flush your toilet, a huge amount of nutrients is lost, along with fresh drinking water, only to become Read More »

Bokashi

TweetEliminate bad smells from your kitchen scraps, and turn them into fertilizer, using Bokashi! What is Bokashi? Bokashi (also ‘EM Bokashi’) is a culture of micro-organisms (yeasts and bacteria) which ferment kitchen Read More »

 

Making Biochar using Dry Mulch (video)

Subtitles:

  • Making Biochar using dry mulch
  • Mulch is loaded into an old beer keg

003: Permaculture as part of a personal evolution

A leucaena tree, I decided to chop down, nature decided to regrow!

A leucaena tree, I decided to chop down, nature decided to regrow!

It’s a leap to shift from thinking that there must be one right thing to do, one correct way to see a landscape, or best practice for developing a sustainable food system, to the discovery that there are many mutually beneficial things to do, many useful ways to see a landscape, and many developmental paths which can be taken toward sustainability.

For a long time I sat in the backyard and tried to reason what the next step should be, what the right thing to do must be. If ever something stood out as a foolproof action to take, I took such action with trepidation, as there always seemed more variables involved than I could possibly consider, and the thought that I might regret the steps I take now haunted me, as I’ve never enjoyed back-tracking or undoing what’s been done. It’s no surprise that in the two years since my last post, change in the backyard has been rather slow!

It’s dawned on me though that there need not be a single right action to take, if one can recognise the cloud of possibilities that all point toward improvement. Nature seems geared toward development, balance and maximum efficiency anyway, and it’s likely that it would do just fine without me. And so my efforts have settled to a gentle encouragement of what’s already working, what nature and I agree on, and less of the forceful experimentation I’ve been used to.

It seems there’s a spectrum between two extremes; at one end – nature left to her own devices (Masanobu Fukuoka’s ‘do-nothing’ farming), and at the other – commercial agriculture, where nature is exploited as much as possible, for maximum gain. Permaculture fits anywhere that a practice is sustainable, which I imagine would be closer to Fukuoka’s end of the spectrum. But any development of a landscape toward a regenerative food system, while in keeping with natural processes, is still a forceful process with human gain as the ultimate goal, and whether you’re growing salad greens in containers on a balcony, or casting seeds willy-nilly into a backyard jungle, you are always applying some force to a scenario that would play out quite differently if you weren’t there to influence it. In this compromise there will always be at least two perspectives to take into account – that which nature would do without you, and that which you would have nature do for you. Herein there can never be one ‘right’ thing to do, one ‘correct’ approach, but only guesswork – an intuition as to what might benefit both parties mutually.

So what I wait for now is not an intellectual lightbulb moment – a right thing to do – but an intuition that resonates; an idea that I love and which I feel invited to implement. Usually they are small motions, like scattering some legume seeds here and there, pruning a branch here and there, always with a view to increasing life and diversity, minimising effort and damage, so that the natural processes already occurring can continue uninhibited, and I can save my energy too. The result is a backyard that only half reflects my intention, and the rest is a magic show.

I still have a plan for how I’d like the backyard to be, with a tropical zone here, a citrus zone there, and a canopy to boot, but it’s all in pencil.

Developing the backyard has been as much an evolution of my own thinking, as it has an evolution of the soil and life emerging therein. I wonder what the next development will be…

Home-scale double-barrel top-lit-up-draft biochar retort stove!

Biochar Retort

“Biochar can be made cleanly and effectively on a home-scale, using a biochar retort.”

Biochar is a desirable material for anyone looking to improve their soil. Buried, it acts as a water retainer, nutrient trapper, and home for beneficial bacteria and plant roots, and it continues to support life and fertility for thousands of years! On a home-scale, biochar can be made from waste wood or mulch, using a biochar retort.

Benefits:

  • Produces biochar – a permanent soil amendment
  • Burns clean and hot
  • Can be used for heating or cooking
  • Can be fuelled with waste materials

Making a Coffee with Biogas (video)

Subtitles:

  • Close the gas-out valve on the digester
  • Open the gas-out valve on the collector

Feeding a Biogas Digester (video)

Subtitles:

  • Turn off the gas-out valve
  • Fit the effluent bucket securely

002: Integration

 Integration

A fruit tree can do more than just grow fruit!

A fruit tree can do more than just grow fruit!

001: From Sand to Sustainability

A Brief History

It’s been two years since I began work on the backyard, and it’s been a chaotic process of trial and error and learning. My aim has always been to grow lots of food, but the ideas and ideology driving me have evolved at the same rate as the backyard.

What is Permaculture?

What do I think it is?

Permaculture is a vector through which people can learn and apply themselves to affect change in a landscape toward a regenerative, life-supporting food forest system. Well at least that’s how I see it. It is a set of principles and techniques that is freely available to read about on the internet, and courses are run all around the world to disseminate its message.

But what is it really?

Design for My Biogas Digester

Biogas Digester

“Biogas is the perfect solution to modern sustainable cooking.”

Biogas is a mixture of gasses that are produced as anaerobic bacteria break down organic matter. It is flammable, capable of producing a clean flame for cooking and heating, and it can be derived from as simple a feedstock as your kitchen rinse water.

A biogas digester is a container holding water and bacteria, which can be ‘fed’ organic matter to be broken down, and which collects the resultant biogas, to be tapped off either to a collector for storage, or directly for burning.

Benefits:

  • Creates flammable gas
  • Creates fertiliser
  • Runs on kitchen rinse water
  • Safe and Clean

Rebar Fence Trellis 02

Rebar Fence Trellis

“Make a self-supporting post-less fence trellis out of rebar!”

In Spring 2011 I wanted to make a fence across the backyard for three reasons; to enclose a chicken run, to grow fruit vines, and to support a future pvc arbour I had planned. Traditional fencing options were expensive, but I found a way to do it using only rebar steel mesh. The result exceeded my hopes.

Benefits:

  • Creates Vertical Space
  • Encloses Chickens
  • Supports Vines
  • Lasts 10 Years